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Download Canadian Organizational Behaviour 8th Edition Pdf and Learn from the Best Canadian Experts


Canadian Organizational Behaviour 8th Edition Pdf Free Download




Are you looking for a comprehensive and engaging textbook that covers the latest theories and practices of organizational behaviour in Canada? Do you want to learn how to apply these concepts to real-world situations and improve your performance as a manager, employee, or student? If yes, then you might be interested in Canadian Organizational Behaviour 8th edition by Steven L. McShane, Sandra L. Steen, Kevin Tasa, and Alex Stajkovic. This book is one of the most popular and widely used textbooks on organizational behaviour in Canada, with over half a million copies sold since its first edition. In this article, we will tell you what Canadian Organizational Behaviour is, why it is important, what are the main topics covered in the 8th edition, and how to get a pdf free download of this book. Let's get started!




Canadian Organizational Behaviour 8th Edition Pdf Free Download



What is Canadian Organizational Behaviour?




Organizational behaviour (OB) is the study of how people think, feel, and act in organizations. It examines the individual, group, and organizational factors that influence human behaviour at work. It also explores how organizations can be designed and managed to enhance employee well-being, motivation, performance, teamwork, leadership, culture, change, and innovation.


Canadian Organizational Behaviour is a branch of OB that focuses on the specific context, issues, and challenges of managing people in Canada. It considers the cultural diversity, social values, legal environment, economic conditions, political system, labour market, technological trends, and global influences that shape the behaviour of Canadian workers and organizations. It also highlights the best practices and examples of successful Canadian organizations that have adopted effective OB strategies.


Why is Canadian Organizational Behaviour important?




Canadian Organizational Behaviour is important for several reasons. First, it helps you understand yourself and others better in the workplace. By learning about the factors that affect your personality, perception, motivation, emotions, attitudes, values, ethics, communication style, decision making process, conflict resolution skills, leadership style, power tactics, and organizational citizenship behaviour, you can improve your self-awareness, self-regulation, and self-development. By learning about the factors that affect other people's behaviour, you can enhance your social awareness, social skills, and social influence. By learning about the factors that affect group and organizational behaviour, you can foster a positive and productive work environment, build effective teams, manage diversity and inclusion, promote organizational culture and identity, and facilitate organizational change and innovation.


Second, Canadian Organizational Behaviour helps you achieve your personal and professional goals. By applying the theories and concepts of OB to your own work situation, you can increase your motivation, performance, satisfaction, engagement, commitment, and well-being. By applying the theories and concepts of OB to your interactions with others, you can improve your relationships, collaboration, cooperation, trust, loyalty, and support. By applying the theories and concepts of OB to your organization, you can contribute to its vision, mission, values, goals, strategies, policies, procedures, and outcomes.


Third, Canadian Organizational Behaviour helps you cope with the challenges and opportunities of working in Canada. By being aware of the unique features and trends of the Canadian work environment, you can adapt to the changing demands and expectations of your job, career, industry, and market. By being aware of the diverse needs and preferences of the Canadian workforce, you can respect and appreciate the differences and similarities among your colleagues, customers, suppliers, partners, competitors, and stakeholders. By being aware of the best practices and examples of Canadian organizations, you can learn from their successes and failures and emulate their strengths and avoid their weaknesses.


What are the main topics covered in Canadian Organizational Behaviour 8th edition?




Canadian Organizational Behaviour 8th edition is divided into four parts: Part One: Introduction; Part Two: Individual Behaviour and Processes; Part Three: Team Processes; Part Four: Organizational Processes. Each part consists of three or four chapters that cover a specific topic related to OB. Here is an overview of the chapters:


Chapter 1: Introduction to Organizational Behaviour




This chapter introduces the field of OB and explains its relevance for managers, employees, and students. It defines OB as an interdisciplinary field that draws on various disciplines such as psychology, sociology, anthropology, economics, political science, and management. It also describes the three levels of analysis in OB: individual, group, and organizational. It then presents the main challenges and opportunities for OB in Canada, such as globalization, workforce diversity, technological change, ethical behaviour, social responsibility, and employee well-being.


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define organizational behaviour (OB) and explain its importance for managers, employees, and students.



  • To identify the main disciplines that contribute to OB knowledge.



  • To distinguish between the three levels of analysis in OB: individual, group, and organizational.



  • To describe the main challenges and opportunities for OB in Canada.



Chapter 2: Individual Behaviour, Personality, and Values




This chapter examines how individual differences in behaviour, personality, and values affect work outcomes. It defines behaviour as the observable actions of people at work, personality as the relatively stable set of psychological characteristics that influence how people respond to their environment, and values as the abstract ideals that guide one's thinking and behaviour across situations. It then discusses the main theories and models of personality, such as the Big Five model, the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI), the Holland's RIASEC model, and the Schwartz's value theory. It also explains how personality and values can be measured, assessed, and developed in organizations.


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define behaviour, personality, and values and explain how they influence work outcomes.



  • To describe the main theories and models of personality.



  • To describe the main theories and models of values.



  • To explain how personality and values can be measured, assessed, and developed in organizations.



Chapter 3: Perception, Attribution, and Diversity




This chapter explores how people perceive themselves and others in organizations. It defines perception as the process of receiving and interpreting information from the environment, attribution as the process of explaining the causes of one's own and other people's behaviour, and diversity as the variety of demographic and psychological characteristics that distinguish people from one another. It then discusses the main factors that influence perception and attribution, such as selective attention, stereotyping, halo effect, primacy effect, recency effect, contrast effect, self-fulfilling prophecy, fundamental attribution error and self-serving bias. It also explains how diversity affects organizational behaviour and performance and how organizations can manage diversity effectively.


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define perception, attribution, and diversity and explain how they affect organizational behaviour.



To identify the main factors that influence perception Chapter 4: Motivation Theories and Practices




This chapter analyzes how people are motivated to perform well in organizations. It defines motivation as the extent to which persistent effort is directed toward a goal. It then discusses the main theories and models of motivation, such as the Maslow's hierarchy of needs, the Herzberg's two-factor theory, the Alderfer's ERG theory, the McClelland's acquired needs theory, the expectancy theory, the equity theory, the goal-setting theory, and the self-determination theory. It also explains how motivation can be enhanced by using various practices, such as job design, job enrichment, job enlargement, job rotation, job crafting, empowerment, participation, feedback, recognition, rewards, and incentives.


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define motivation and explain how it affects work outcomes.



  • To describe the main theories and models of motivation.



  • To explain how motivation can be enhanced by using various practices.



Chapter 5: Motivation and Performance Management




This chapter examines how people's motivation is linked to their performance in organizations. It defines performance as the degree to which an individual meets the expectations and standards of his or her role, and performance management as the process of defining, measuring, appraising, and improving performance. It then discusses the main factors that influence performance, such as ability, skill, knowledge, competence, experience, training, education, and feedback. It also explains how performance can be measured and appraised by using various methods, such as objective measures, subjective measures, graphic rating scales, behaviourally anchored rating scales (BARS), forced distribution, 360-degree feedback, and balanced scorecard. It also describes how performance can be improved by using various interventions, such as coaching, mentoring, counselling, discipline, and termination.


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define performance and performance management and explain how they affect organizational behaviour.



  • To identify the main factors that influence performance.



  • To explain how performance can be measured and appraised by using various methods.



  • To describe how performance can be improved by using various interventions.



Chapter 6: Teams and Teamwork




This chapter explores how people work together in teams in organizations. It defines team as a group of two or more people who interact with each other to achieve a common goal and teamwork as the process of collaborating and cooperating with other team members. It then discusses the main types and characteristics of teams, such as functional teams, cross-functional teams, self-managed teams, virtual teams, diverse teams, size, composition, roles, norms, cohesion and trust. It also explains how teams can be developed and managed by using various models and techniques, such as the Tuckman's stages of team development (forming, storming, norming, performing, and adjourning), the Belbin's team roles (plant, resource investigator, coordinator, shaper, monitor evaluator, teamworker, implementer, completer finisher, and specialist), the Hackman's conditions for team effectiveness (real team, compelling direction, enabling structure, supportive context, and expert coaching), the Katzenbach and Smith's team performance curve (working group, pseudo-team, potential team, real team, and high-performance team), the Lencioni's five dysfunctions of a team (absence of trust, fear of conflict, lack of commitment, avoidance of accountability and inattention to results), and the Edmondson's psychological safety (the belief that one will not be punished or humiliated for speaking up with ideas or concerns).


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define team and teamwork and explain how they affect organizational behaviour.



  • To describe the main types and characteristics of teams.



  • To explain how teams can be developed and managed by using various models and techniques.



Chapter 7: Communication in the Workplace




This chapter investigates how people communicate with each other in organizations. It defines communication as the process of transmitting and receiving information among people. It then discusses the main elements and models of communication, such as the sender-receiver model (sender-encoding-message-channel-decoding-receiver-feedback-noise), the Shannon-Weaver model (information source-transmitter-signal-received signal-receiver-destination), the Schramm model (encoder-message-decoder-feedback), and the Berlo's SMCR model (source-message-channel-receiver). It also explains how communication can be improved by using various skills and strategies, such as active listening, empathy, assertiveness, persuasion, influence, negotiation, conflict resolution, nonverbal communication, written communication, oral communication, visual communication, and electronic communication.


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define communication and explain how it affects organizational behaviour.



  • To describe the main elements and models of communication.



  • To explain how communication can be improved by using various skills and strategies.



Chapter 8: Power and Politics in Organizations




This chapter examines how people use power and politics in organizations. It defines power as the ability to influence the behaviour of others and politics as the process of using power to achieve one's goals in a situation where there is uncertainty or disagreement. It then discusses the main sources and types of power, such as legitimate power, reward power, coercive power, expert power, referent power, information power, connection power, and personal power. It also explains how power can be used and abused by using various tactics and behaviours, such as rational persuasion, inspirational appeals, consultation, ingratiation, personal appeals, exchange, coalition building, pressure, legitimating, and upward appeals.


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define power and politics and explain how they affect organizational behaviour.



  • To describe the main sources and types of power.



  • To explain how power can be used and abused by using various tactics and behaviours.



Chapter 9: Conflict and Negotiation in the Workplace




This chapter explores how people deal with conflict and negotiation in organizations. It defines conflict as the process of perceiving and responding to differences that are perceived as incompatible or threatening and negotiation as the process of exchanging and agreeing on terms that are acceptable or beneficial to both parties. It then discusses the main causes and types of conflict, such as task conflict, relationship conflict, process conflict, interpersonal conflict, intergroup conflict, and organizational conflict. It also explains how conflict can be resolved or managed by using various styles and methods, such as competing, collaborating, compromising, avoiding, accommodating, integrating, obliging, dominating, avoiding, compromising, mediation, arbitration, conciliation, and third-party intervention.


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define conflict and negotiation and explain how they affect organizational behaviour.



  • To describe the main causes and types of conflict.



  • To explain how conflict can be resolved or managed by using various styles and methods.



Chapter 10: Leadership in Organizational Settings




This chapter analyzes how people lead others in organizations. It defines leadership as the process of influencing the activities of others toward the achievement of a common goal. It then discusses the main theories and models of leadership, such as the trait theory, the behavioural theory, the contingency theory, the path-goal theory, the leader-member exchange theory, the transformational leadership theory, the transactional leadership theory, the charismatic leadership theory, the servant leadership theory, the authentic leadership theory, and the distributed leadership theory. It also explains how leadership can be developed and evaluated by using various tools and techniques, such as self-assessment, feedback, coaching, mentoring, training, education, experience, observation, role modelling, simulation, action learning, 360-degree feedback, leader effectiveness index (LEI), leader behaviour description questionnaire (LBDQ), multifactor leadership questionnaire (MLQ), and leadership practices inventory (LPI).


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define leadership and explain how it affects organizational behaviour.



  • To describe the main theories and models of leadership.



  • To explain how leadership can be developed and evaluated by using various tools and techniques.



Chapter 11: Organizational Culture




This chapter investigates how people create and share a common identity in organizations. It defines organizational culture as the set of shared values beliefs assumptions norms symbols stories rituals the Trompenaars and Hampden-Turner's cultural dimensions (universalism vs particularism individualism vs communitarianism neutral vs emotional specific vs diffuse achievement vs ascription sequential vs synchronic internal vs external control) the Schwartz's cultural values (conservatism intellectual autonomy affective autonomy hierarchy mastery harmony egalitarianism) the GLOBE's cultural clusters (Anglo Latin Europe Nordic Europe Germanic Europe Eastern Europe Latin America Sub-Saharan Africa Middle East Southern Asia Confucian Asia) the Cameron and Quinn's competing values framework (clan culture adhocracy culture market culture hierarchy culture) and the Schein's levels of culture (artefacts espoused values basic assumptions). It also explains how organizational culture can be created changed and maintained by using various factors and processes such as founders and leaders vision and mission values and goals strategies and policies structures and systems rites and rituals stories and symbols language and communication socialization and training rewards and recognition innovation and learning feedback and evaluation.


The learning objectives of this chapter are:


  • To define organizational culture and explain how it affects organizational behaviour.



  • To describe the main dimensions and types of organizational culture.



  • To explain how organizational culture can be created changed and maintained by using various factors and processes.



Chapter 12: Organizational Change and Innovation




This chapter examines how people adapt to new situations in organizations. It defines organizational change as the process of modifying or transforming the existing state of an organization to a desired future state and organizational innovation as the process of creating or adopting new or improved products services processes or practices in an organization. It then discusses the main drivers and types of organizational change such as external drivers (environmental uncertainty technological change competitive pressure customer demand social trends legal regulations) internal drivers (strategy structure culture leadership performance crisis) planned change (change that is intentional proactive and goal-oriented) emergent change (change that is unplanned reactive and adaptive) incremental change (change that is gradual continuous and small-scale) radical change (change that is sudden discontinuous and large-scale) developmental change (change that improves the current state of an organization) transitional change


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